Solenoid Valve Troubleshooting

Before you assume it’s a lost cause, follow a  few troubleshooting tips for direct-acting solenoid valves.  If doing these things doesn’t help, call Stromquist to order a new one!

Problem:  Valve will not operate when valve circuit is energized

Possible Cause: Low voltage or no voltage to coil.  Possible Solution: Check voltage at coil; it should be at least 85% of nameplate rating.

Possible Cause:  Burned out coil.  Possible Solution: See “Coil Failure” below.

Possible Cause: Foreign matter jamming core in core tube. Possible Solution: Clean valve; install strainer close to valve inlet.

Possible Cause: Binding core or damaged core tube. Possible Solution: Replace valve.

Possible Cause:  Excessive fluid pressure. Possible Solution: Reduce pressure to valve nameplate pressure rating or install suitable valve.

Problem: Valve will not close or shift when valve circuit is de-energized

Possible Cause: Coil not de-energized. Possible Solution: Check electrical control circuit.

Possible Cause: Foreign matter jamming core in core tube. Possible Solution: Clean valve; install strainer close to valve inlet.

Possible Cause: Damaged disc or seat causing internal leakage. Possible Solution: Replace with new parts.

Possible Cause: Binding core or damaged core tube. Possible Solution: Replace with new parts.

Possible Cause: Damaged spring. Possible Solution: Replace with new spring; never elongate or shorten spring.

Problem:  Coil Failure

Possible Cause: Overvoltage. Possible Solution: Check voltage at coil; voltage must conform to nameplate rating.

Possible Cause: Damaged core or core tube causing inrush current to be drawn continuously. Possible Solution: Check for damaged core, core tube or spring. Check for scale or foreign matter on the core or inside the core tube.

Possible Cause: Foreign matter jamming the core in core tube and causing inrush current to be drawn continuously. Possible Solution: Clean thoroughly and replace any damaged parts.

Possible Cause: Excessive fluid pressure causing inrush current to be drawn continuously. Possible Solution: Reduce pressure or install suitable valve.

Possible Cause: Excessive ambient or fluid temperature. Possible Solution: Class A coils are limited to ambient temps of 77 degrees F. For temps up to 167 F, use Class F coils; for temps up to 212 F, use Class H.

Possible Cause: Missing solenoid parts. Possible Solution: Install missing solenoid housing and other metal parts or properly install incorrectly assembled metal parts. The housing and other metal parts form part of the magnetic circuit and are required to provide impedance needed to limit current draw.

Possible Cause: Moisture inside solenoid enclosure. Possible Solution: Waterproof the entrance conduit to prevent entry of moisture. If valve is mounted outdoors, check to see that enclosure is weatherproof and that gaskets are in good condition; use appropriate sealant when required. If general-purpose enclosure is used in a damp or humid atmosphere, use watertight, molded coils.

 

 

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6 Responses

  1. All steps has been checked , but coil solenoid valves type EVR 20 some times working some times not working ,?
    Could somebody to advice ?

  2. Good Morning:

    I have a solenoid valve in my well put at my summer home. The solenoid is wired to a regular power switch in our cottage. When I turn off the switch, the water back flushes into our well pit draining the water from the system via gravity.

    The water valve in the pit started leaking last year, it remains open so when the switch is turned off, the water will automatically drain. It was part of the system when we bought the property and works well so the water is not left on when we are not here and drains the system during cold times to minimize the likelihood of freezing.

    We no longer use the property when the weather changes seasonally so all I did was close the water valve.

    My question is this: if I have the solenoid removed, and replace the water valve and then turn off the power switch that was going to the solenoid, will the pump remain off too?

    The pump also has it’s own circuit in our power box so I am not sure if they solenoid is connected to the pump or if it works by stopping the flow of the water from the pump and actually has no electronic function to the pump directly.

    Can you help me here?

    Thanks,
    Rick
    313.384.3319

  3. It’s good to know that solenoid coil failure can be caused by overvoltage. My brother has been telling me about a new solenoid pump that he wants to get installed in his home, and he wants to make sure that it’s working properly. I’ll share this information with him so that he can look into his options for professionals who can help him with this in the future.

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